Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Awards/Availabilty

Open Access Presidential Scholars Thesis

Abstract

Migration is an intensely personal decision, but mathematical models are useful for quantifying the larger, economic aspects of it. The goal of this research is to use spatial and multiple regression models to study the influence of economic variables on net migration rates in Iowa counties. To achieve this data for many variables was collected from several sources and centered on the year 2000. S-plus software was used to create neighborhood structures, run spatial correlations and regressions, and run multiple regressions and residual diagnostics. The results showed that it is possible to develop a good regression model of migration using net migration as the dependent variable along with various economic covariates. Results also emphasized the rural nature of Iowa, as outliers were often the larger and more urban counties. Two counties in particular, Dallas and Woodbury, were extreme cases for the state of Iowa. This research shows that despite migration's subjective nature, regression models are applicable to the study of migration and can lead to a better understanding of why migration occurs.

Date of Award

2005

Department

Department of Geography

Presidential Scholar Designation

A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation Presidential Scholar

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this Presidential Scholars thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

5-4-2005

Object Description

1 PDF file (v, 20 pages)

Date Digital

4-9-2018

Copyright

©2005 Andrea White

Type

document

Language

EN

File Format

application_pdf

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