Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Awards/Availabilty

Open Access Presidential Scholars Thesis

First Advisor

Darrel W. Davis

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issue of the alledged standards overload problem. This exploration can be accomplished by breaking the topic down into several key areas of discussion. To fully comprehend the nature of the problem, it is necessary to have some background on current generally accepted accounting standards (GAAP): what is the nature of current accounting standards and where do they get their authority?; what is the purpose of current accounting standards, and is this purpose served for both smal 1 and/or privately held companies as wel I as for large, public companies? It is also necessary to have some background on the history of the controversy. The next logical step is to attempt to define the term "small business" -- a task not as easy as it would appear. The exploration of the problem continues with an analysis of both the users of the information found on the financial statements of small and/or nonpublic companies and the users of the information found on the financial statements of large, public companies: are the users different?; do their needs for information differ? Next, an analysis of the costs and benefits of complying with current accounting standards is necessary: does the cost/benefit ratio differ for small and/or nonpublic companies and for large, public companies? Assuming that a standards overload problem does exist, a discussion of possible solutions to the problem is the final step.

Date of Award

1991

Department

Department of Accounting

Presidential Scholar Designation

A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation Presidential Scholar

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this Presidential Scholars thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

1991

Object Description

1 PDF file (31 pages)

Date Digital

3-29-2018

Copyright

©1991 - Michelle L. Morgan

Type

document

Language

EN

File Format

application_pdf

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