Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Awards/Availabilty

Open Access Presidential Scholars Thesis

Abstract

Analysis of the durational data of the hypernasal subjects revealed that these subjects produced significantly longer primary stressed syllables. This result may indicate a type of laryngeal compenstation on the part of these speakers. Since they did not rely on an increase in frequency when producing stress, they may have used an increase in duration to compensate. Therefore, a deviance in the upper vocal tract may be causing differences in the physiology of the lower vocal tract for this population.

Further research is needed in this area to substantiate the present study. More information should be obtained in the area of stress production and suprasegmentals in both normal children and children with velopharyngeal incompetence. With the advent further research, coupled with this investigation, speech-language pathologists may be better able to serve this population and aid them in acquiring more normal speech patterns.

Date of Award

1991

Department

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Presidential Scholar Designation

A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation Presidential Scholar

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this Presidential Scholars thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

1991

Object Description

1 PDF file (25 pages)

Date Digital

3-29-2018

Copyright

©1991 - Ann Kathryn Lundberg

Type

document

Language

EN

File Format

application_pdf

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