Faculty Publications

Title

Do scores on an attention test predict scores on executive function tests?

Document Type

Conference

Keywords

Adult, Aging, Attention, Cognition, Executive function

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Clinical Archives of Communication Disorders

Volume

3

Issue

3

First Page

192

Last Page

200

Abstract

Purpose: This study sought to determine if younger and older adults' scores on the Attention Process Test predicted scores on the Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome and Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies. Methods: The Attention Process Test, the Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome, and the Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies were administered to 60 younger and 60 older adults in a counter-balanced manner. Regression statistics were calculated to determine any predictive outcomes. Results: For older adults, the Attention Process Test significantly predicted the Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome's total profile standard scores, and the Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies' total standard scores for Accuracy, Rationale, and in one analysis significantly predicted Reasoning. For younger adults, when correcting for high correlations among the five Attention Process Test subtests, this test did not significantly predict their scores on the Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome or the Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies' total standard scores. Conclusions: The Attention Process Test was consistently a significant predictor of executive function measures in older adults, but not younger adults, suggesting the relationship between attention and executive function may be different for these age groups. Thus, different evaluation procedures may be warranted for older adults versus younger adults. A caveat of these findings is that these results were obtained with healthy, neurologically intact individuals. Future research should further investigate the relationship between attention and executive function in adults with acquired neurological damage.

Original Publication Date

12-1-2018

DOI of published version

10.21849/cacd.2018.00402

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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