Faculty Publications

Title

The climate of change: Library organizational structures, 1985–1990

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Reference Librarian

Volume

15

Issue

34

First Page

79

Last Page

93

Abstract

Changes in information technology, in institutional or societal imperatives, and in user expectations are forcing library administrators to re-examine not only the library's basic services but also the organizational structures which have been created over time to support those services. Organizational change-particularly structural change-is prescribed. The traditional separation of the two major divisions of libraries, technical services and public services, has often been the focus for discussions of library organizational change. Are libraries modifying their organizational structures? Are models evolving which may be adapted by other libraries? The author reports the results of a recent survey of organizational change in university libraries and describes the changes which are taking place. While the long-standing structures are still largely in place, new alignments of functions and non-traditional work unit groupings are becoming more commonplace. No matter how a given research library defines its future, collaboration, flexibility, and fluidity will be the key attributes that characterize its operations and services. (Woodsworth et al., 1989, p.138). Current library administrations should move quickly to flatten hierarchical structures. (Heim, 1989, p.199). Typically identified as the most desirable future is a scenario that includes a flexible organizations facilitating staff growth and increased contribution to the university missions. (Webster, 1989, p.201). © 1991 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

Original Publication Date

1-1-1991

DOI of published version

10.1300/J120v15n34_10

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