Faculty Publications

Title

The impact of instructional technology use, course design, and sex differences on students’ initial perceptions of instructor credibility

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Caring, Competence, Course type, Credibility, Instructional technology, Trustworthiness

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Communication Quarterly

Volume

53

Issue

2

First Page

177

Last Page

196

Abstract

This study explores the impact that instructional technology use, course design, and sex differences have on students’ initial perceptions of instructors’ credibility (i.e., competence, trustworthiness, and perceived caring). Participants included 864 students from two Midwestern universities who were randomly assigned to one of 16 experimental conditions (i.e., scenarios) manipulating the use of technology across two types of courses and across two types of instructors (i.e., male and female instructors). Multivariate analyses revealed a two-way interaction effect of technology use by student sex on perceptions of instructor credibility. Follow-up procedures revealed both a curvilinear and a linear effect for technology use on students’ perceptions of instructor competence. In terms of instructor trustworthiness, however, only a curvilinear effect emerged. Finally, the results suggested that technology use has both a curvilinear and a linear effect on perceptions of perceived caring, though the linear effect size was marginal at best. Among the most important implications of this research is the fact that technology use produced the strongest effect size for the perceived caring dimension of instructor credibility. © 2005 Eastern Communication Association.

Original Publication Date

1-1-2005

DOI of published version

10.1080/01463370500090399

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