Faculty Publications

Title

The impact of job characteristics on work-to-family facilitation: Testing a theory and distinguishing a construct

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Occupational Health Psychology

Volume

10

Issue

2

First Page

97

Last Page

109

Abstract

This study used objective measures of job characteristics appended to the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), self-reported job characteristics, and an individual resource characteristic (orientation toward personal growth) to test a theory of work-family facilitation. Results indicated that resource-rich jobs enable work-to-family facilitation. A higher level of work-to-family facilitation was reported by individuals in jobs with more autonomy and variety and whose jobs required greater substantive complexity and social skill. There was no support for the hypotheses that these effects would be more pronounced for individuals with higher levels of personal growth. The authors found significant differences in the strength of the associations of job characteristics with work-to-family facilitation and work-to-family conflict, suggesting they are different constructs with distinct antecedents. Copyright 2005 by the Educational Publishing Foundation.

Original Publication Date

4-1-2005

DOI of published version

10.1037/1076-8998.10.2.97

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