Faculty Publications

Title

Does religion matter? A comparison study of the ethical beliefs of marketing students of religious and secular universities in Japan

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Comparison study, Ethical beliefs, Japan, Religion

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Business Ethics

Volume

65

Issue

1

First Page

69

Last Page

86

Abstract

This study was designed to examine the determinants of and differences between the ethical beliefs of two groups of Japanese students in religious and secular universities. Multiple regression analysis revealed that students of the Japanese religious university perceived that young, male, relativistic, and opportunistic students tended to behave less ethically than did older, female, and idealistic students. Students of the Japanese secular university perceived that male, achievement-oriented, and opportunistic students tended to behave less ethically than did female and experience-oriented students. Opportunism was found to be one of the most important determinants in explaining misconduct, Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) revealed that students of the Japanese secular university tended to score higher on achievement and humanism, and lower on theism and positivism than did students of the Japanese religious university. In addition, students of the Japanese secular university were somewhat more sensitive to academic dishonesty practices than were students of the Japanese religious university. © Springer 2006.

Original Publication Date

4-1-2006

DOI of published version

10.1007/s10551-006-0023-4

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