Faculty Publications

Title

Race/ethnicity and perinatal depressed mood

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology

Volume

24

Issue

2

First Page

99

Last Page

106

Abstract

This study examined the extent to which race/ethnicity is a risk factor for depressed mood in late pregnancy and the early postpartum period apart from its relationship with other demographic and infant outcome variables. Data obtained from 26,877 women with newborns in Iowa indicate that 15.7% endorsed a single depression item. Logistic regression results indicate that race/ethnicity was a significant predictor of depressed mood, controlling for age, marital status, income and educational level, and infant health outcome. Compared to White women, African-American women were significantly more likely to report depressed mood (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.03-1.52). Hispanic women were significantly less likely to report being depressed (OR=0.74, 95% CI=0.61-0.88). The role of social support in understanding these findings is explored. © 2006 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.

Original Publication Date

5-1-2006

DOI of published version

10.1080/02646830600643908

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