Faculty Publications

Title

Individual-level predictors of perceived safety: Data from an international sample

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Sociological Focus

Volume

44

Issue

3

First Page

231

Last Page

254

Abstract

This article compares individual characteristics of people residing in different global regions and how they affect a person’s perceived risk of victimization. Prior research has extensively explored perceived risk of victimization, but few studies have been able to research the issue cross-nationally. The International Crime Victimization Survey data are used to explore perceived risk of victimization among those who reside in different global regions. This study explores the individual-level characteristics to determine whether this set of variables explains a person’s perception of risk while out after dark. Results of the ordered logistic analysis show that gender, age, living in an urban residence, having previously been a victim, and socioeconomic status affect perceived risk but that effects differ by global region. © 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original Publication Date

1-1-2011

DOI of published version

10.1080/00380237.2011.10571397

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