Faculty Publications

Title

Effects of acclimation and egg-incubation temperature on selected temperature by hatchling western painted turtles (Chrysemys picta bellii)

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Acclimation temperature, Chrysemys, Emydid turtles, Incubation temperature, Temperature gradient, Thermoregulation

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Thermal Biology

Volume

36

Issue

8

First Page

507

Last Page

514

Abstract

The ability of hatchling turtles to detect environmental temperature differences and to effectively select preferred temperature is a function that critically impacts survival. In some turtle species, temperature preference may be influenced by embryonic and post-hatching conditions, such as egg-incubation and acclimation temperature. We tested for effects of embryonic incubation temperature (27.5 °C, 30 °C) and acclimation temperature (20 °C, 25 °C) on the selected temperature and movement patterns of 32 Chrysemys picta bellii (Reptilia: Emydidae) hatchlings in an aquatic thermal gradient of 14-34 °C and in single-temperature (20 °C, 25 °C) control tests. Among 10-11 month old hatchlings, acclimation temperature and egg-incubation temperature influenced temperature selection and movement patterns. Acclimation temperature affected activity and movement: in thermal gradient and single-temperature control tests, 25 °C-acclimated turtles relocated between chambers significantly more frequently than individuals acclimated to 20 °C. Acclimation temperature also affected temperature selection: 20 °C-acclimated turtles selected a specific temperature during gradient tests, but 25 °C-acclimated turtles did not. Among 20 °C-acclimated turtles, egg-incubation temperature was inversely related to selected temperature: hatchling turtles incubated at 27.5 °C selected the warmest temperature available (34 °C); individuals incubated at 30 °C selected the coldest temperature (14 °C). These results suggest that interactions of environmental conditions may influence post-hatching thermoregulatory behavior in C. picta bellii, a factor that ultimately affects fitness. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

Original Publication Date

12-1-2011

DOI of published version

10.1016/j.jtherbio.2011.09.001

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