Faculty Publications

Title

Effects of exercise on tests measuring attention and executive function in younger and older adults

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Adult, Attention, Cognition, Executive function, Exercise

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Clinical Archives of Communication Disorders

Volume

6

Issue

1

First Page

18

Last Page

27

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated whether or not performance differed between Young and Older Exercisers and between Young and Older Non-exercisers on the Attention Processing Training-Test (APT-Test), Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS), and Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies (FAVRES). Methods: A total of 119 participants were divided into the following groups: 46 Young Exercisers: (aged 18-40 years), 45 Older Exercisers (aged 60 and older), fourteen Young Non-exercisers, and fourteen Older Non-exercisers. Participants completed the APT-Test, BADS, and FAVRES in a counterbalanced manner. Independent sample t-tests were used to calculate outcomes. Results: Young Exercisers had significantly higher scores than Older Exercisers on the APT-Test, BADS Total Profile Score, and the FAVRES Total Accuracy Score. No significant differences occurred between Young and Older Exercisers on the FAVRES Total Rationale, Total Time, or Reasoning scores. No statistically significant differences occurred on any measures between Young and Older Non-exercisers. Conclusions: Different performance trends occurred between the Exerciser groups and the Non-exerciser groups. For example, both Exerciser groups performed similarly on the FAVRES when asked to justify their responses and perform reasoning tasks. Older Exercisers provided correct responses for Accuracy measures, yet their responses did not earn the total points. No differences occurred on any test between the Non-exerciser groups. Thus, it could be helpful for clinicians to inquire about patients' pre-morbid exercise habits when using these tests. Participants were healthy, neurologically intact adults. Future research should investigate potential effects exercise has on these tests in adults with acquired neurological damage.

Department

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Original Publication Date

1-1-2021

DOI of published version

10.21849/CACD.2021.00360

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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