Faculty Publications

Title

Commitment to strength and conditioning: A sport commitment model perspective

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Dedication, Motivation, Psychology

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Volume

27

Issue

3

First Page

718

Last Page

722

Abstract

Weiss, WM and Halupnik, D. Commitment to strength and conditioning: A sport commitment model perspective. J Strength Cond Res 27(3): 718-722, 2013-The purpose of this study was to empirically apply the sport commitment constructs within the realm of strength and conditioning. Based on prior research in the sport domain, it was predicted that higher enjoyment, investments, benefits, and social support and lower perceived costs and attractive alternatives would predict higher commitment to strength and conditioning. With a sample of 191 intercollegiate male and female athletes, a pilot study was conducted to examine the predictors of commitment to strength and conditioning. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the strongest predictors of strength and conditioning commitment were perceived investments, benefits, enjoyment, costs, and attractive alternatives. Interestingly, differences emerged between men and women regarding the most salient predictors of commitment to strength and conditioning. Gender differences also emerged with male athletes reporting higher perceptions of enjoyment, benefits, and perceived obligation to their best friend to continue strength and conditioning. These findings are important both theoretically and practically. The Sport Commitment Model may provide an avenue to gain a further insight into strength and conditioning motivation, and providing practical strategies for increasing athletes' commitment: increasing enjoyment and perceived benefits, and decreasing perceived downsides and attractive alternatives. © 2013 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Original Publication Date

3-1-2013

DOI of published version

10.1519/JSC.0b013e31825d9baf

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