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Document Type

Article

Abstract

The Roman Poet Virgil (Pubilius Vergilus Maro) and Geoffrey Chaucer both wrote poems in the Trojan War tradition with destiny as a strong central theme. However, destiny is treated differently in each work. For Aeneas, in Virgil's Aeneid, destiny means history. For Troilus, in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, destiny is tragedy. I wish first to examine both poems in detail, concentrating on the love stories in each, in order to describe how these two systems of destiny are presented, and then to look at how these two cosmologies compare with each other. Such analysis yields evidence of Virgil's influence on Chaucer.

Publication Date

1995

Journal Title

Draftings In

Volume

8

Issue

1

First Page

51

Last Page

59

Comments

No cover/title page date shown on piece.

Copyright

© 1995 by the Board of Student Publications, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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