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Document Type

Article

Abstract

Geoffrey Chaucer specifies that his Troilus and Criseyde is a "tragedye" (V.1786). He avoided rewriting Dante's Commedia (later designated The Divine Comedy), giving us instead a human tragedy, which he based on the plot of Boccaccio's Il Filostrato and on the structure and imagery of the Dantean masterpiece. As Winthrop Weatherbee points out, "Chaucer has appropriated the resources of the greatest Christian poet [Dante] to show us through Troilus' experience what love is in itself, as well as what, being merely human, it cannot be . . . " (145). By contrasting Troilus' story with that of Dante's Pilgrim in the Commedia, Chaucer questions the condemnation of sexual love within a Christian universe.

Publication Date

1995

Journal Title

Draftings In

Volume

8

Issue

1

First Page

5

Last Page

14

Comments

No cover/title page date shown on piece.

Copyright

© 1995 by the Board of Student Publications, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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