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Document Type

Article

Abstract

As the late C. A. Patrides points out in Milton and the Christian Tradition, Paradise Lost is not a theological treatise, but it is a religious poem. More to the point, it is a "Christian Protestant Poem" (5). As a Christian poem, Paradise Lost offers a dynamic network of contrasts: good vs. evil, love vs. hate, humility vs. pride, reason vs. passion, servitude vs. freedom, and the Son vs. Satan. A less obvious, yet equally compelling, contrast is that between the two meals that occur in the epic. These two meals are set in opposition to one another and used, I believe, to illustrate the radical difference between the Puritan form of the Communion Service and the Communion ritual of the Roman Catholic Church.

Publication Date

1991

Journal Title

Draftings In

Volume

6

Issue

1

First Page

27

Last Page

35

Copyright

© 1991 by the Board of Student Publications, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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