•  
  •  
 

Document Type

Article

Abstract

In the past two decades unions have fallen upon hard times. Although the total labor force has been increasing since 1970, the number of union members in 1988 (17 million) (Bauman 1989, p. 4) is below the 1970 level of 21.4 million (Kovach 1985, p. 850). The percentage of the work force in labor unions has fallen from a high of 42 percent in 1954 (Carrel 1989, p. 545) to 16.8 percent in 1988 (Bauman 1989, p. 4). Furthermore, the percentage of workers belonging to unions is expected to decline to 10 percent by 1995 (Taylor, 1989, p. 31). Several factors have contributed to the decline of labor unions. They include the shift from blue-collar industry dominance to white collar service industry dominance; increased foreign competition; the increased number and percentage of women and minorities in the work force; increased government and management power over unions; and the decreased effectiveness of union leadership. As a result of these factors, union membership has fallen and the economic power and political influence of organized labor has been drastically reduced.

Publication Date

1990

Journal Title

Draftings In

Volume

5

Issue

2

First Page

10

Last Page

16

Comments

This issue is also considered v.6 of the initial publication series of Major Themes in Economics.

Copyright

© 1990 by the Board of Student Publications, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.