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Title

The Association Between Parent and Adult Child Severe Mental Illness

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Mental illnesses affect many individuals and are subject to higher rates of stigmatization than physical illnesses (Robinson et al., 2019). Some research has begun to investigate how stigmatizing beliefs are formed, including learning beliefs from society as a whole about groups, or on a smaller scale such as the modeling of rejection by family members (Link et al., 1989; Bandura, 1977; Erzinger & Gruenfeld-Steiger, 2014) The current study investigates the association between current stigma held by adult children and perception of their parents’ stigmatizing beliefs during their childhood. Participants in this study completed questionnaires about their current beliefs about mental illness and perceptions of their parents’ beliefs and stigmatizing behaviors the parent engaged in during their childhood. The anticipated result of this study will be that participants who currently endorse more stigmatizing beliefs about mental illness will perceive that their parents are more highly stigmatizing of mental illness. Additional exploratory analyses examining parent avoidance of people with mental illness and conversations about mental illness will also be conducted.

Start Date

12-4-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

12-4-2022 1:50 PM

Faculty Advisor

Seth Brown

Department

Department of Psychology

Student Type

Graduate Student

Comments

Graduate Program: Psychology: Clinical Science

Award: Intercollegiate Academic Fund

This entry was part of the following session:

  • Date: Tuesday, April 12, 2022
  • Time: 1:00 to 1:30 p.m.
  • Moderator: Katelyn Browne

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:50 PM

The Association Between Parent and Adult Child Severe Mental Illness

Mental illnesses affect many individuals and are subject to higher rates of stigmatization than physical illnesses (Robinson et al., 2019). Some research has begun to investigate how stigmatizing beliefs are formed, including learning beliefs from society as a whole about groups, or on a smaller scale such as the modeling of rejection by family members (Link et al., 1989; Bandura, 1977; Erzinger & Gruenfeld-Steiger, 2014) The current study investigates the association between current stigma held by adult children and perception of their parents’ stigmatizing beliefs during their childhood. Participants in this study completed questionnaires about their current beliefs about mental illness and perceptions of their parents’ beliefs and stigmatizing behaviors the parent engaged in during their childhood. The anticipated result of this study will be that participants who currently endorse more stigmatizing beliefs about mental illness will perceive that their parents are more highly stigmatizing of mental illness. Additional exploratory analyses examining parent avoidance of people with mental illness and conversations about mental illness will also be conducted.