Complete Schedule

Title

Flow from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Exploratory Case Analyses of Post-traumatic Growth after Life-altering Attention Loss

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

While several studies have investigated post-traumatic growth among persons with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI), no studies have investigated the role of flow in mediating the relationship between TBI and creative achievement. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants (N=2) who experienced mild-to-moderate TBIs. Participants’ intense efforts to regain self-control align with the centrality of intense concentration in flow theory, as well as Csikszentmihalyi’s argument that control of attention determines quality of life. Evidence of growth in the participants’ experience includes conquering anxiety and developing meaningful criteria for allocating attention based on agency, creativity, adaptability, and community engagement.

Start Date

11-4-2022 12:00 PM

End Date

11-4-2022 12:50 PM

Faculty Advisor

Gary Gute

Department

Department of Biology

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Comments

This entry was a part of the following session:

  • Date: Monday, April 11, 2022
  • Time: 12:00 to 12:50 p.m.
  • Moderator: Christine Bennett

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 12:00 PM Apr 11th, 12:50 PM

Flow from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Exploratory Case Analyses of Post-traumatic Growth after Life-altering Attention Loss

While several studies have investigated post-traumatic growth among persons with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI), no studies have investigated the role of flow in mediating the relationship between TBI and creative achievement. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants (N=2) who experienced mild-to-moderate TBIs. Participants’ intense efforts to regain self-control align with the centrality of intense concentration in flow theory, as well as Csikszentmihalyi’s argument that control of attention determines quality of life. Evidence of growth in the participants’ experience includes conquering anxiety and developing meaningful criteria for allocating attention based on agency, creativity, adaptability, and community engagement.