2020 INSPIRE Student Research & Engagement Showcase

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (UNI Access Only)

Abstract

Participants completed self-report measures that were designed to either prime terrorism/crime or environmental threat. Overall, these primes had no main effect on political orientation or political attitudes. However, environmental threats increased sadness and negative affect, which, in turn, were associated with more liberal political attitudes. These findings suggest that threats may not necessarily favor a conservative shift.

Start Date

14-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

14-4-2020 4:00 PM

Faculty Advisor

Helen C. Harton

Department

Department of Psychology

Student Type

Graduate Student

File Format

application/pdf

Off-Campus Access

Share

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 12:00 PM Apr 14th, 4:00 PM

The Effect of Environmental and Terrorism/Crime Threats on Political Orientation and Attitudes: Failure to replicate Thórisdóttir and Jost (2011)

Participants completed self-report measures that were designed to either prime terrorism/crime or environmental threat. Overall, these primes had no main effect on political orientation or political attitudes. However, environmental threats increased sadness and negative affect, which, in turn, were associated with more liberal political attitudes. These findings suggest that threats may not necessarily favor a conservative shift.