2020 INSPIRE Student Research & Engagement Showcase

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (UNI Access Only)

Keywords

Stigma (Social psychology); Depressed persons--Employment; Work environment;

Abstract

Possible moderators between disclosure of depression in the workplace and self-stigma (negative internalized beliefs about mental illness) were tested using multiple regression models. A total of 229 adult employees from Amazon’s mTurk who reported depressive symptoms completed online measures of disclosure, self-stigma, core self-evaluations, and workplace social support. Disclosure was not significantly correlated with self-stigma. High core-self evaluations (self-esteem, self-efficacy, neuroticism, and locus of control) and high workplace social support significantly predicted low self-stigma. Within a clinical setting, targeting negative thoughts about oneself and improving self-esteem and self-efficacy may help reduce self-stigma. Additionally, increased support and resources in the workplace may help reduce self-stigma.

Start Date

17-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

17-4-2020 4:00 PM

Faculty Advisor

Seth Brown

Department

Department of Psychology

Student Type

Graduate Student

File Format

application/pdf

Off-Campus Access

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Apr 17th, 12:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:00 PM

Self-Stigma and Disclosure of Depression in the Workplace

Possible moderators between disclosure of depression in the workplace and self-stigma (negative internalized beliefs about mental illness) were tested using multiple regression models. A total of 229 adult employees from Amazon’s mTurk who reported depressive symptoms completed online measures of disclosure, self-stigma, core self-evaluations, and workplace social support. Disclosure was not significantly correlated with self-stigma. High core-self evaluations (self-esteem, self-efficacy, neuroticism, and locus of control) and high workplace social support significantly predicted low self-stigma. Within a clinical setting, targeting negative thoughts about oneself and improving self-esteem and self-efficacy may help reduce self-stigma. Additionally, increased support and resources in the workplace may help reduce self-stigma.