Complete Schedule

Title

Gender Stereotypes in Hispanics and Caucasians

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Sex role; Men, White--Attitudes; Hispanic American men--Attitudes;

Abstract

Previous literature has explored gender role stereotypes across culture; however, there is a dearth of data comparing Caucasian and Hispanic communities. Individuals are taught from a young age the difference between males and females (Silván-Ferrero & López, 2007); thus, gender roles are ingrained at a young age. This leads to gender roles stereotypes being difficult to challenge (Lemus, Spears, Bukowski, Moya & Lupiáñez, 2013). The current study examines gender roles and expectations between Caucasian and Hispanic men. Specifically, we examined self-ratings of masculinity and femininity (Bem Sex Role Inventory) and gender role expectations of others (Traditional Machismo and Caballerismo Scale) among Hispanic and Caucasian men. It was hypothesized that: (1) Hispanics would score higher than Caucasians on the Bem Masculinity subscale and Traditional Machismo, and (2) there would be no difference on Caballerismo. Participants’ ages ranged of 18 to 62 years old. The majority of data were collected using Amazon’s mTurk; however, some was collected in person. A series of t-tests were conducted to compare Caucasian men to Hispanic men on the three primary dependent variables (DVs). Contrary to hypotheses, all t-tests were nonsignificant, except Caballerismo. On the Caballerismo subscale indicated a significant difference between Caucasians (M = 5.44, SD = .94) and Hispanics/Latinos (M = 5.68, SD = .81); t(349) = -2.50, p = .013. Additionally, there was an interesting pattern of correlations between the DVs, which will be reported in a table. In future research, examining the data from a cross-generational point of view might be of interest.

Start Date

3-4-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

3-4-2018 1:30 PM

Faculty Advisor

Elizabeth Lefler

Department

Department of Psychology

Embargo Date

3-30-2018

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 3rd, 11:00 AM Apr 3rd, 1:30 PM

Gender Stereotypes in Hispanics and Caucasians

Previous literature has explored gender role stereotypes across culture; however, there is a dearth of data comparing Caucasian and Hispanic communities. Individuals are taught from a young age the difference between males and females (Silván-Ferrero & López, 2007); thus, gender roles are ingrained at a young age. This leads to gender roles stereotypes being difficult to challenge (Lemus, Spears, Bukowski, Moya & Lupiáñez, 2013). The current study examines gender roles and expectations between Caucasian and Hispanic men. Specifically, we examined self-ratings of masculinity and femininity (Bem Sex Role Inventory) and gender role expectations of others (Traditional Machismo and Caballerismo Scale) among Hispanic and Caucasian men. It was hypothesized that: (1) Hispanics would score higher than Caucasians on the Bem Masculinity subscale and Traditional Machismo, and (2) there would be no difference on Caballerismo. Participants’ ages ranged of 18 to 62 years old. The majority of data were collected using Amazon’s mTurk; however, some was collected in person. A series of t-tests were conducted to compare Caucasian men to Hispanic men on the three primary dependent variables (DVs). Contrary to hypotheses, all t-tests were nonsignificant, except Caballerismo. On the Caballerismo subscale indicated a significant difference between Caucasians (M = 5.44, SD = .94) and Hispanics/Latinos (M = 5.68, SD = .81); t(349) = -2.50, p = .013. Additionally, there was an interesting pattern of correlations between the DVs, which will be reported in a table. In future research, examining the data from a cross-generational point of view might be of interest.