2017 Research in the Capitol

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Spintronics; Manganese alloys--Magnetic properties;

Abstract

Operation of virtually any modern electronic device relies on magnetic materials. In particular, these materials are the cornerstone of data storage and processing in computer hardware elements, such as hard drives and random access memories. Here, we theoretically study an interplay between structural and magnetic properties of MnCrVAl, a material which recently attracted significant attention due to its rather exotic electronic structure. In particular, this material behaves either as an insulator or as a metal, depending on which “spin” (an intrinsic property of any fundamental particle) of the electron is considered. Using advanced computer simulation techniques (density functional calculations on a supercomputer), we show that structural disorder (i.e. displacement of atoms from their regular positions) in this material has a decisive impact on its magnetic properties. Our theoretical findings are in excellent agreement with recently published experimental results, and may open new avenues in an emerging field of spin-based electronics.

Start Date

28-3-2017 11:30 AM

End Date

28-3-2017 1:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Pavel Lukashev

Department

Department of Physics

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Tuesday, October 31, 2017

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Mar 28th, 11:30 AM Mar 28th, 1:30 PM

Effect of Structural Disorder on Magnetic Properties of MnCrVAl

Operation of virtually any modern electronic device relies on magnetic materials. In particular, these materials are the cornerstone of data storage and processing in computer hardware elements, such as hard drives and random access memories. Here, we theoretically study an interplay between structural and magnetic properties of MnCrVAl, a material which recently attracted significant attention due to its rather exotic electronic structure. In particular, this material behaves either as an insulator or as a metal, depending on which “spin” (an intrinsic property of any fundamental particle) of the electron is considered. Using advanced computer simulation techniques (density functional calculations on a supercomputer), we show that structural disorder (i.e. displacement of atoms from their regular positions) in this material has a decisive impact on its magnetic properties. Our theoretical findings are in excellent agreement with recently published experimental results, and may open new avenues in an emerging field of spin-based electronics.