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Title

Associations Between Romantic Relationship Attachment and Sleep Patterns: The Moderating Role of Alcohol

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Associations between sleep patterns and relationship factors like attachment have not been widely explored among adults (Verdecias et al., 2009; Carmichael & Reis, 2005). The purpose of this study was to identify whether secure and insecure patterns of romantic relationship attachment were associated with sleep patterns. Furthermore, a secondary purpose of the study was to explore the moderating role of alcohol consumption in the attachment - sleep quality link. We examined 153 undergraduate students from the University of Northern Iowa. Self-report measures were used to assess key study measures. Preliminary analyses indicated that secure attachment was associated with better sleep quality (i.e., low rates of insomnia, sleepiness, and sleep-wake problems), and insecure attachment was associated with poor sleep quality. Alcohol consumption per week, per month, as well as binge drinking were associated with poor sleep quality. There was support 22 for the moderating role of alcohol in the insecure attachment (anxiety and avoidance) to daytime sleepiness link. Future research on sleep patterns among college students should emphasize alcohol consumption as it relates to specific types of sleep disorders.

Start Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 1:15 AM

Faculty Advisor

Dilbur D. Arsiwalla

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:15 AM

Associations Between Romantic Relationship Attachment and Sleep Patterns: The Moderating Role of Alcohol

Associations between sleep patterns and relationship factors like attachment have not been widely explored among adults (Verdecias et al., 2009; Carmichael & Reis, 2005). The purpose of this study was to identify whether secure and insecure patterns of romantic relationship attachment were associated with sleep patterns. Furthermore, a secondary purpose of the study was to explore the moderating role of alcohol consumption in the attachment - sleep quality link. We examined 153 undergraduate students from the University of Northern Iowa. Self-report measures were used to assess key study measures. Preliminary analyses indicated that secure attachment was associated with better sleep quality (i.e., low rates of insomnia, sleepiness, and sleep-wake problems), and insecure attachment was associated with poor sleep quality. Alcohol consumption per week, per month, as well as binge drinking were associated with poor sleep quality. There was support 22 for the moderating role of alcohol in the insecure attachment (anxiety and avoidance) to daytime sleepiness link. Future research on sleep patterns among college students should emphasize alcohol consumption as it relates to specific types of sleep disorders.