2021 Three Minute Thesis

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Abstract

Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) is a versatile sport fish popularly fished across Kansas. Over the last decade, Bluegill catch rates have decreased, likely from high angler harvest rates of larger individuals. Large males that exhibit parental care have high growth rates and aggressively defend nests, making them vulnerable to angling. Males that display cuckoldry behavior reach maturity sooner, exhibit slower growth rates, and are generally smaller. The goal of this study is to determine if fisheries-induced evolution resulting from long-term harvest has led to a decline in the growth rate of Bluegill. A total of 100 individuals were sampled from ten small impoundments in Southeast Kansas. Five impoundments were identified as having high angling pressure and five as low angling pressure. All individuals were genotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) collected by restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Genetic variation within and between impoundments will be analyzed using population genomics techniques.

Start Date

12-11-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

12-11-2021 1:30 PM

Event Host

Graduate College, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Peter Berendzen

Department

Department of Biology

Comments

Heat 1, Group 1 - Oak Room, Maucker Union

Graduate Program: Biology

File Format

application/pdf

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Nov 12th, 12:00 PM Nov 12th, 1:30 PM

Genetic effect of long-term angling pressure on Bluegill populations in small impoundments in Kansas

Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) is a versatile sport fish popularly fished across Kansas. Over the last decade, Bluegill catch rates have decreased, likely from high angler harvest rates of larger individuals. Large males that exhibit parental care have high growth rates and aggressively defend nests, making them vulnerable to angling. Males that display cuckoldry behavior reach maturity sooner, exhibit slower growth rates, and are generally smaller. The goal of this study is to determine if fisheries-induced evolution resulting from long-term harvest has led to a decline in the growth rate of Bluegill. A total of 100 individuals were sampled from ten small impoundments in Southeast Kansas. Five impoundments were identified as having high angling pressure and five as low angling pressure. All individuals were genotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) collected by restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Genetic variation within and between impoundments will be analyzed using population genomics techniques.