Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Awards/Availabilty

Open Access Presidential Scholars Thesis

First Advisor

Robert Seager

Abstract

A mouse gene cloned in the laboratory of James and Olivia Smith at Baylor College of Medicine was found to be involved in motor function. This gene was named CRFl for Clq-Related Factor 1, and using in situ hybridization, it was found to be expressed mainly in the brainstem of adult mice. There is a gene similar to the CRFl gene in humans. By determining this gene's role in mouse development, more will be known about the development of human motor function.

To determine the stage of embryonic development at which the expression of this gene begins, a series of in situ hybridization experiments were performed on saggital sections of embryos at 11.5, 12.5, 13.5, 14.5, and 16.5 days of development using a diglabeled riboprobe made from CRF template DNA. Two types of substrate detection, NBT/BCIP and fluorescence, were used to visualize the probe. In several experiments, no specific hybridization occurred. In the remainder of the experiments, the hybridization that occurred in specific tissues was not repeatable and therefore unreliable.

Date of Award

1999

Department

Department of Biology

Presidential Scholar Designation

A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation Presidential Scholar

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this Presidential Scholars thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

1999

Object Description

1 PDF file (19 pages)

Date Digital

2-15-2018

Copyright

©1999 - Margaret Gruber

Type

document

Language

EN

File Format

application_pdf

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