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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Fusarium orthoceras produced necrosis of succulent root tissues of soybean seedlings and infected tips of lateral roots of older plants. Pods and seeds were most susceptible to fungus penetration after maturity. High relative humidity was necessary for infection of seeds. Maximum stand reduction and yield loss under field conditions were obtained when seeds were sown in Fusarium-contaminated soil before rains. In a greenhouse the disease was most destructive when plants were grown in soil at 100-percent water-holding capacity at 21° C. The disease was less damaging to plants grown in soil at the same moisture level at 27°. Seedlings grown in contaminated soil at 100-percent water-holding capacity at 21° for three weeks wilted permanently in a few hours when the temperature was raised to 33°, whereas plants in noncontaminated soil did not wilt.

Publication Date

1961

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

68

Issue

1

First Page

106

Last Page

113

Copyright

© Copyright 1961 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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