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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Since two of the tranquilizing drugs, chlorpromazine and reserpine, are believed to act upon the hypothalamus, and since mammals that hibernate are presumed to have a different hypothalamus from non-hibernating laboratory animals, a logical design was to study the effects of these two drugs on bats, hamsters, mice, and white rats. The bats were more resistant than mice to reserpine. Hamsters did not show hypothermic effects with either drug at room temperature, except as reflected in the heart rate under reserpine. In a cold environment when rats and hamsters were compared, effects were opposite in respect to both core temperature and heart rate. Rats were consistently more sensitive to chlorpromazine in the cold (perhaps a peripheral effect), whereas hamsters were consistently more sensitive to reserpine (perhaps a central effect).

Publication Date

1960

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

67

Issue

1

First Page

480

Last Page

487

Copyright

© Copyright 1960 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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