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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Although many species of fishes normally congregate in schools, the majority of these fishes will successfully survive in an individual existence. However, the question has been raised as to what extent the operant behavior of schooling fishes remains unchanged when they are isolated from the group. Experiments by Welty (1934) have indicated that goldfish learn mazes more rapidly when grouped than when isolated. Further, he found that motor responses are retained by a group better than by an individual. Breder and Halpern (1946) point out that fishes will sometimes not feed until they see a companion feeding. In order to further explore this question an experiment was designed to study operant discrimination of a group of fishes behaving both as a school and as individuals.

Publication Date

1958

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

65

Issue

1

First Page

393

Last Page

397

Copyright

© Copyright 1958 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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