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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Aphanizomenon flos-aquae is a blue green alga which forms a conspicuous part of the algal bloom in many of Iowa's lakes. It is associated with species of Anabaena and Microcystis; these three genera being widely known as "Fanny, Anny and Mike". The compound colonies of Aphanizomenon, which consist of hundreds of laterally coherent filaments lying in approximately one plane, have the macroscopic appearance of lawn grass clippings floating in the water. Although this organism is well known and has been well described, a somewhat spectacular aspect of its growth and reproduction is not touched upon in discussions which are readily available. Rose (1934) described spore germination and early flake formation under laboratory conditions. Shortly after germination, groups of filaments were observed to be coherent in the form of small flakes. During a discussion with Mr. Rose, in the summer of 1952, he indicated that he had never had an opportunity to analyze satisfactorily the method by which these microscopic flakes increased in size to the macroscopic forms which consist of hundreds of filaments. Since this organism has an economic significance, it seemed that this aspect of the growth of A. flos-aquae might be examined further.

Publication Date

1953

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

60

Issue

1

First Page

117

Last Page

118

Copyright

© Copyright 1953 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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