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Document Type

Research

Abstract

The problem of color discrimination of animals has been variously discussed by writers. While it is generally conceded that the cones are the receptors of color, the different theories of vision as expounded by Young and Helmholtz, Hering, Ladd-Franklin and others are not always in essential agreement that specific cones are the receptors of specific wave lengths of light. While form discrimination of rats has been clearly demonstrated in the researches of Fields, Fritz, Lashley and others, the discrimination of color by the lower forms of animals is not so well established. Writers also differ as to primates, but since the infra-human eye has many of the morphological and anatomical characteristics of the human eye it is reasonable to assume that the functions are similar. As the functional aspects become more nearly like those of the human, the perception of color becomes a greater possibility.

Publication Date

1951

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

58

Issue

1

First Page

321

Last Page

330

Copyright

© Copyright 1951 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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