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Document Type

Research

Abstract

The black locust tree has been of value to man for many decades. It was introduced into Europe from the Appalachian region in the early part of the seventeenth century. Over a wide area on both continents it has had three important uses: the strong, spreading root system is well adapted for holding eroding soil; the durability of its wood in contact with the soil makes it of great value as fence posts which are becoming increasingly difficult to obtain; and it is a legume with that family's useful quality of improving the soil on which it grows by the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. Limitations to its adaptability and use have been discovered at intervals throughout the long period since its introduction, in a wide variety of sites. Many locust plantings fail for no apparent reason. Others seem to become established, only to be wiped out by the locust borer in a few seasons. This paper is primarily concerned with the evaluation of some methods of planting-site preparation used in an effort to produce thrifty, vigorous, fast-growing trees on eroded Lindley loam in southern Iowa.

Publication Date

1950

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

57

Issue

1

First Page

73

Last Page

90

Copyright

© Copyright 1950 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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