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Document Type

Research

Abstract

The current soil survey of Monona County has revealed many differences in the alluvial deposits occurring in the Missouri River bottomlands. As a consequence the soils developed from these different deposits show numerous dissimilarities. It is the purpose of this paper to describe and explain the causes of the differences encountered. The principal factors in soil formation are climate, organisms, topography, parent material and time. In the Missouri River bottomlands of Monona County it can be assumed that climate and organisms are not important causes of soil differences. In general, differences in topography are closely related to differences in parent material. Thus parent material or time of deposition or both, must be the principal cause or causes of soil differences. The soils found on the Missouri River bottomlands are, for the most part, formed from alluvial materials. Some coarser alluvium may have been resorted by wind action subsequent to deposition but areas showing evidence of wind action are not extensive. The principal source of alluvium is the Missouri River; next, the tributary rivers and streams; and, of least importance, the steep bluffs that form the sides of the valley.

Publication Date

1950

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

57

Issue

1

First Page

253

Last Page

258

Copyright

© Copyright 1950 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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