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Authors

Herman Wiebe

Document Type

Research

Abstract

It is a well-known fact that forced aeration is beneficial, even essential for plants growing in solutions. It has also been reported beneficial for soil grown plants on various occasions. However, these reports are usually based on the appearance and yield of the mature plants. Information on the plant responses to aeration throughout the growing period is more limited. Clark and Shive in 1932 found that tomatoes grown in nonaerated nutrient solutions started flowering and fruiting somewhat earlier than the aerated controls, although later the aerated plants gave a much greater yield of fruit. Durell in 1941, also working with tomatoes in solution cultures, reported that at the beginning of fruiting the yield from aerated and nonaerated plants was about the same, but that later the aerated plants greatly surpassed the others in the total yield of fruit. These reports suggest that aeration is not equally beneficial at all stages of growth. It therefore seemed desirable to conduct an experiment with plants growing in soil to find the effect of aeration at early and late stages of the ontogeny of the tomato.

Publication Date

1949

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

56

Issue

1

First Page

183

Last Page

188

Copyright

© Copyright 1949 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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