•  
  •  
 

Document Type

Research

Abstract

One of the problems of the investigator of parasitic fungi is that of obtaining ascospore stages of the organism in cultures derived from diseased plant parts. Such cultures often produce mycelium or mycelium and conidia without the corresponding ascospore stage. With the advent of our knowledge of heterothallism such sexual stages have often been grown artificially by the mating of self-sterile strains. A few cases of heterothallism, in which the sexes are segregated on separate thalli, are also known. Finally, with homothallic fungi that fruit with difficulty in ordinary culture some advance on the problem has been made by students of the nutritional requirements of fungi, particularly under the leadership of Lilly (3). These workers have found that supplementation of of the substrate with vitamins often leads to fruition in cultures that have hitherto been considered sterile or lacking in one or more spore stages.

Publication Date

1949

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

56

Issue

1

First Page

129

Last Page

131

Copyright

© Copyright 1949 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.