•  
  •  
 

Document Type

Research

Abstract

Plant physiologists throughout the years have used various substrates in an attempt to secure one which would give plant responses comparable to those of soil. Plants grown in water culture method, as practiced by the physiologist of the nineteenth century, showed little correlation with those grown in solid substrates or soil. Plants grown in chemically inert sand give results closer to those in soil but serious limitations are still encountered. In recent years gravel and other coarse mineral materials have been employed and the plant growth responses obtained correlate quite closely with those found when soil is used. Certain disadvantages have been found with many mineral media which are not totally inert, physically or chemically. Often the physical phenomena of adsorption and ionic replacement have been found to seriously alter the composition of the nutrient solution when mineral substrate is used. The bringing of the mineral into soluble form by the root acid has also been a definite drawback.

Publication Date

1948

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

55

Issue

1

First Page

185

Last Page

197

Copyright

© Copyright 1948 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.