•  
  •  
 

Document Type

Research

Abstract

Accompanying certain types of inflammation the heat-regulating mechanism of the body is disrupted so that heat accumulates and the body temperature rises. The individual is said to have a fever. Since the early work of Ledingham (1908) in which he showed that the rate of phagocytosis increased with a rise in temperature, a moderate fever has come to be regarded as a defense mechanism of the body. It is, therefore, of some significance that the normal and deviations from normal temperature be known for laboratory animals which are to be used to measure the response of an individual host to an artificial infection. Since mouse typhoid, a highly fatal disease occurring among mice and caused by the micro-organism Salmonella typhimurium has been likened in some respects to the typhoid of humans caused by Eberthella typhosum, it is all the more important that the temperature aspect of mouse typhoid be investigated. The present paper presents some preliminary results from experiments in which rectal temperatures were obtained for normal and inoculated mice of resistant and susceptible inbred strains.

Publication Date

1947

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

54

Issue

1

First Page

383

Last Page

388

Copyright

© Copyright 1947 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.