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Document Type

Research

Abstract

In addition to the puff balls and stinkhorns reported on previously1,2 many other interesting fungi are found among the Gasteromycetes, a few of which it seemed proper to include in this series. They are certain earth-stars, the common birds'-nest fungi, a stalked puff ball and a curious form which throws its spore ball like a catapult. The earth-stars, all in the genus Geastrum, are peculiar in that the outer wall of the basidiocarp, consisting of three well-defined layers, splits into lobes which bend away from the inner wall, giving the mature structure the characteristic star-shaped appearance. They are not uncommon but their color and the fact that they remain close to the ground allow them often to be overlooked. The birds'-nest fungi, as the name implies, have a number of spore balls (peridioles) enclosed in cup-shaped receptacles (basidiocarps) which are covered by a rupturing membrane (epiphragm). The sporidioles are attached to the interior of the cup by a mycelial thread, the funiculus, which by hygroscopic movements causes them to be discharged from the cup and thus aids their dissemination. Two species in separate genera, Crucibulum levis (DC) Kambly and Cyathus striatus Pers. are presented.

Publication Date

1947

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

54

Issue

1

First Page

131

Last Page

137

Copyright

© Copyright 1947 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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