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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Since the discovery of the anti-biotic effects of the blue-violet end of the spectrum, (Ward, 1894) this light has been widely applied to practical advantage. The bactericidal properties of these rays have been extensively utilized in the sterilization of air. Fulton (1929), Welch (1930), Luyet (1932), Duggar and Dimond (1940), and others, have shown the deleterious effect of ultra-violet light on certain fungal spores. Problems of food spoilage due to contamination with common molds have recently become more significant than heretofore. Spoilage of bakery products has become especially serious due to delays in deliveries and prolonged storage occasioned by curtailment of transportation. The well-known anti-biotic properties of ultra-violet radiation upon microorganisms seemed to offer possibilities of a simple method of controlling the common molds involved in bread spoilage. As an approach to such a solution of spoilage in bakery goods, it seemed desirable first to test the sensitivity of the molds most commonly causing damage. Data are given on the inactivating effects of varying dosages of continuous and intermittent ultra-violet energy applied directly to the mold spores.

Publication Date

1944

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

51

Issue

1

First Page

185

Last Page

189

Copyright

© Copyright 1944 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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