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Document Type

Research

Abstract

The region traversed by Highway 17, between Fort William and Kenora in southwestern Ontario, Canada (Figure 1), lies within the area described by Nichols (1935) as the northern coniferous forest. This region has been severely glaciated by ice of the Fifth Wisconsin substage (Thwaites, 1934). Following the retreat of the ice, much of the area was inundated by Early Lake Agassiz and other lakes that are now smaller than in early post-Pleistocene time. During the course of postglacial time many of the ponds and shallow portions of the lakes have filled with peat, and extensive bog land is now present. The mineral soils are shallow, as one would expect in a region of extensive glacial scour. They are deepest where moraines, outwash, and glacial lake deposits are present. The underlying rocks are granites, gneisses, and basalts. Outcrops are abundant and frequently extensive. The terrain is flat to rolling, and the relief is approximately three hundred feet in parts of the region.

Publication Date

1943

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

50

Issue

1

First Page

261

Last Page

272

Copyright

© Copyright 1943 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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