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Document Type

Research

Abstract

In undertaking a discussion of biology in education it is highly desirable to view the subject against the general background of American education as a whole. Among the nations of the world, the United States possesses the unique distinction of having mass education. We owe this policy to the shrewd foresight of the fathers of the American Revolution, to their recognition of the fact that the success of representative government depends upon an enlightened electorate. As an object of primary importance, George Washington enjoined the new nation to "promote institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge." In his first inaugural address he stated that "as government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened." Though we as individuals commonly regard education as a means of improving our economic status, American statesmen have never lost sight of its greater importance in making democracy feasible. Because the civic value of education far transcends its benefits to the individual student, a system of free public was established and the education made compulsory.

Publication Date

1942

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

49

Issue

1

First Page

467

Last Page

474

Copyright

© Copyright 1942 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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