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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Beginning with a sterile, dwarf tomato haploid of Lycopericon esculentum, carrying 12 univalent chromosomes, and a completely homozygous diploid strain with 12 pairs of chromosomes and highly fertile was produced by asexual doubling of chromosomes with the decapitation-callus technique. The latter was in turn doubled by the same method producing the relatively sterile homozygous autotetraploid form with 18 chromosomes (12 sets of quadrivalents). This n-2n-4n series of tomatoes provides unique material to test the influence of the very same genes in different dosages. The length of the guard cells along the median line affords a means of distinguishing between haploid, diploid and tetraploid plants. Stomata length averages 15 microns in haploid, 24 microns in diploid, and 3G microns in tetraploid plants. Stomata length in the three classes of plants is roughly in the ratio 5:8:12. Epidermal cells of haploid plants are approximately isodiametric, those of the tetraploid are considerably longer than wide, and those of the diploid are intermediate in proportions.

Publication Date

1941

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

48

Issue

1

First Page

196

Last Page

196

Copyright

© Copyright 1941 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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