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Article Title

Thirty Iowa Liverworts

Document Type

Research

Abstract

Two years ago a distribution of "One Hundred Iowa Mosses" (Conard, 1939) was reported to the Academy. Vie are now about to send out "Thirty Iowa Liverworts." 10. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. In general liverworts are much scarcer in a prarie region than mosses. There is no possibility of ever distributing another thirty species. Most of the liverworts of Iowa are woodland plants: plants of mesic habitat, in complete or partial shade (Plagiochila, Lophocolea, Frullania, Porella). Some occur on moist shaded sandstone - our most mesic condition (Plectocolea, Leiocolea, Jamesoniella, Jungermannia. Conard 1940). Anthoceros must be considered hydric. Ricciocarpus natans is known to have fruited only twice, the interval being about thirty years. In both cases the floating form was fertile, the spores ripening in April. The land form is always sterile in Iowa. Well fruited land forms have recently been distributed by Miss Faith Pennybaker, collected in Louisiana, December 3. Reboulia and Mannia fragrans are distinctly xeric. Mannia inhabits exposed dry rocks in wooded areas, or stony hills in the prairie.

Publication Date

1940

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

47

Issue

1

First Page

97

Last Page

99

Copyright

© Copyright 1940 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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