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Document Type

Research

Abstract

We have today definite, scientific methods for determining the degree of alcoholic intoxication of any individual. We commonly hear that some person can "hold his liquor" better than another. Alcohol must be absorbed into the bloodstream and carried to the brain where it acts as a depressant, to cause intoxication (2). Alcohol may be absorbed directly into the blood stream and its absorption is affected by a full or empty condition of stomach, strength of alcoholic beverage, rate of drinking, quantity of alcohol, and resistance to absorption such as might be found in the case of "tapers." Intoxication is therefore not to be measured by amount of liquor drunk but by the amount reaching the brain. The blood alcohol concentration is a very close indication of the brain alcohol concentration. Maximum intoxication usually occurs between one-half hour and two hours after drinking. Most of the alcohol is oxidized at the rate of 5 to 10 grams per hour in the body. Not more than about 10 percent is lost through excretions as in urine, breath and sweat.

Publication Date

1939

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

46

Issue

1

First Page

211

Last Page

215

Copyright

© Copyright 1939 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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