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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Seeds have been stored in constant low temperatures, constant room temperatures, and in fluctuating temperatures, both in dry and wet, and alternating dry and wet conditions. The experiments which have now run a number of years show that moisture is not necessary for hard seeds to become permeable. The change from hardness to a condition of permeability depends upon the fluctuation of temperature over a relatively long period of time. Seeds stored where the temperature fluctuates as in unheated sheds tend to become permeable each spring and if stored over a period of years under such conditions probably lose much vitality because of their becoming permeable. Stored in a constant temperature the seeds remain hard. 19. The multinucleate-In the stems of developing maize plants and in the young leaves two to several bodies resembling nuclei are commonly present in the majority of the cells. These bodies vary much in shape and size in the same cells. Some of them are similar to the x bodies described in maize and sugar cane affected with a mosaic disease. These bodies are prevalent in corn that is apparently healthy.

Publication Date

1935

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

42

Issue

1

First Page

82

Last Page

83

Copyright

© Copyright 1935 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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