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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Experimentation has repeatedly demonstrated that phase, time and intensity, as physical variants, function in much the same manner in determining the directional localization of sound. Their "effects" are alike; the relationship of the angular displacement to the differences in the stimuli in each case is approximately the same; each factor has its optimal effectiveness; the very slight differences in the stimuli in each case are not perceived as differences in phase, time and intensity as such; and each factor may modify the effectiveness of the others. But, in the complex conditions of ordinary hearing, does either of these factors predominate in determining the directional localization, or are all of these factors reducible to some common factor, or do they each and all contribute to a pattern of effects that results in directional perception?

Publication Date

1928

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

35

Issue

1

First Page

256

Last Page

257

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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