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Authors

Albert Hartzell

Document Type

Research

Abstract

While the writer was connected with the Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station the potato leafhopper (Empoasca mali) appeared in immense numbers in the Upper Mississippi Valley. Investigations were carried on during the summers of 1919, 1920 and 1921 at Ames, Iowa, to establish definitely the relation of this insect to the disease it transmits, commonly called tipburn or hopperburn of potatoes, which was causing severe damage to the potato crop, and if possible devise means for its control. The difficulty experienced in separating closely related species of Empoasca, which had been confused by former investigators, led to the desire to trace the systematic relationships of this group in the hope of establishing a more satisfactory means of identification, which has resulted in a systematic revision of the genus. The need of more biological data, especially of those species which are of economic importance, prompted a detailed study of the life histories of the potato leafhopper (Empoasca mali) and its closely related species, the apple leafhopper (E. unicolor) to remove the confusion that has until recently existed in the economic literature regarding these forms. A detailed life history of the latter species is here presented with a summary of the writer's work on the life history of mali.

Publication Date

1923

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

30

Issue

1

First Page

87

Last Page

133

Copyright

©1923 Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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