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Authors

Henry S. Conard

Document Type

Research

Abstract

In October, 1911, a student at Grinnell College, Miss Winnie Gilbert, brought in a specimen of the pink stink-horn, Simblum sphaerocephalum Schlecht. It was found on the north bank of a deep railroad cut, a mile west of town. Further search in this place resulted in the collection of several mature specimens and a number of "eggs." They grew about half way up the slope, facing south, on Marshall silt loam that had slid down the bank, and about at the level of the boundary between the loess and the glacial drift. Perhaps there are special moisture conditions at this level, though other vegetation does not suggest this. With them were Poa pratensis as dominant plant, as well as Acer negundo seedlings, Physalis species, Aster species, etc. Two or three weeks later my colleague, Prof. H. W. Norris, found specimens on a hillside above Skunk River, three miles southwest of Turner station.

Publication Date

1912

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

19

Issue

1

First Page

103

Last Page

103

Copyright

© Copyright 1912 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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