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Authors

H. W. Norris

Document Type

Research

Abstract

These few notes are given, not that they contain much if anything new, but simply as the record of a year's experimenting. The difficulties connected with the use of paraffine in the sectioning of plant tissue are well known to all students in botanical microscopy. The cutin, cork, etc. of the cell wall resist penetration. The heat necessary to melt paraffine often renders the tissue too hard and brittle for successful manipulation. Freehand sectioning is often the only available method. Frequently this is all sufficient. Celloidin (or collodion) is available for imbedding young and soft tissues, requires no heat and its general cleanliness and easy manipulation recommends its use whenever possible. But many plant tissues are of too firm and resisting a structure to render the use of celloidin even possible. Seeds in their mature condition, will not permit the use of celloidin, and seem to almost defy the penetration of paraffine.

Publication Date

1893

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Sciences

Volume

1

Issue

Pt. 4

First Page

104

Last Page

105

Copyright

©1893 Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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