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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer among black and white females, with approximately 211,000 new cases expected to be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2004 (1). More importantly, incidence has been increasing. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence in U.S. females rose from the 88.6 per 100,000 in the early 1970s to 109.8 in the early 1990s (2). This represents a 24 percent increase over that time. This trend is only partially explained by the known risk factors for breast cancer, including advancing age, early menarche, late menopause, late age at first parturition and family history. Therefore, researchers have been searching for additional contributing factors, including environmental exposure to compounds known or suspected to be carcinogenic or estrogenic (estrogenic compounds are recognized as carcinogens, and are considered particularly important in breast cancer). This search has led to a resurgence of interest in the possible role of the insecticide DDT in breast cancer (3).

Publication Date

2005

Journal Title

International Journal of Global Health and Health Disparities

Volume

3

Issue

2

First Page

70

Last Page

82

Copyright

© Copyright 2005 by the International Journal of Global Health and Health Disparities

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Public Health Commons

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